The price of carp is low compared with other comme

ial fish, but the ease of catching large quantities makes up for this, both men said.

Irwin has turned down a job in Alaska for the summer. Catching carp in Kentucky is a much easier, he said.

“Here, the weather is warmer, the climate is better and I get to sleep in my own bed at t

he end of the day,” he said, adding that the earnings are comparable to what he would get in Alaska.

Irwin and Berry make a good living catching Asian carp, which

are so abundant in rivers and lakes that they have become a serious ecological pr

oblem for states such as Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Illinois and Kentucky.

Ron Brooks, fisheries director at the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, said Asian carp are disru

pting $1 billion worth of recreational and commercial business in western Kentucky alone.

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